ordinary and necessary business expenses

Getting a New Car for Business? Buy or Lease? Part 2: Tax Consequences

This blog will address the tax consequences of both leased and owned vehicles used for business purposes. Hopefully, it will offer some insight into the decision as to what is best for your business: buying or leasing?

With both owned and leased cars, any related expenses may be deducted using the standard mileage rate or the total amount of actual expenses. If the vehicle is owned, you may choose the standard mileage rate in the first year and switch to the actual expense method in a later tax year. If a vehicle is leased, you may also choose the standard mileage rate in the first year but once you the standard mileage rate is chosen, it must be used for the life of the lease.

Tax Treatment of Business Entities Part 4: C Corporations

Startup business owners must consider the legal and tax considerations associated with selecting a particular type of business structure. This is the fourth part of a series of blogs on the tax treatment of business entities. This blog will address the tax treatment of corporations, often referred to for tax purposes as C corporations.

Like an individual person, a corporation may be taxed and held legally liable for its actions. Individual shareholders are generally not personally liable for the debts of a corporation. This is one of the primary reasons that corporations are formed. When one or more individuals form a C corporation, they create an entity with two separate types of taxpayers, the corporation, and the shareholders. As a separate tax-paying entity, a corporation files Form 1120 or 1120-A, U.S. Corporation Income Tax Return.

Cutting Someone Else’s Losses: Conway Twitty & Twittyburger

Harold L. Jenkins, better known as the legendary country music singer, Conway Twitty, was able to accomplish something few before and after him have accomplshed, or even attempted for that matter. That is, pay back those who lost money as a result of an enterprise he sponsored. In a surprise turn of events, Twitty was also able to deduct these repayments from his federal taxes as ordinary and necessary expenses of his business.

Pushing It To The Limit: Odd, Unusual And Crazy Tax Deductions

Working at the IRS or representing clients before the IRS has its perks and advantages. Having the opportunity to observe all of the outlandish and bizarre attempts by taxpayers to assert legitimate,valid tax deductions is rare. On one hand, it certainly may involve the observance of a unique form of comedy. Here are some odd, crazy, unusual, and please note, unsuccessful tax deductions:

*Crazy Home Office Deductions
A woman that ran a home business tried to deduct what was basically her home refrigerator. She explained to her tax professional that she kept drinks in the refrigerator for customers and other business associates that came to the home office for meetings. According to the owner, this occurred four or five times a year while the refrigerator was in her kitchen and served her family.

Testimonials

Categories