IRC §163

Is The $1,100,000 Limitation On Mortgage Debt For Purposes Of Determining Deductible Interest Expense Applied On A Per-Taxpayer Or A Per-Residence Basis?

Is The $1,100,000 Limitation On Mortgage Debt For Purposes Of Determining Deductible Interest Expense Applied On A Per-Taxpayer Or A Per-Residence Basis?Issue

Is the $1,100,000 limitation on mortgage debt for purposes of determining deductible interest expense applied on a per-taxpayer or a per-residence basis?

Related Tax Rules or Regulations

Internal Revenue Code Section 163(h)(3) allows a deduction for qualified residence interest on up to $1,000,000 of acquisition indebtedness and $100,000 of home equity indebtedness. Should your mortgage balance (or balances, since the mortgage interest deduction is permitted on up to two homes) exceed the statutory limitations, the mortgage interest deduction is limited to the amount applicable to only $1,100,000 worth of debt.

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Congress’ Extension Of Expired Deductions

Congress' Extension Of Expired DeductionsAs 2016 starts to move forward, Congress seems especially less likely to agree on legislation extending all the tax breaks that have currently expired. S. 1946, Tax Relief Extension Act of 2015, generally provides for a two-year extension while the Tax Cuts for America Act of 2015, H.R. 1808, has only seven tax provisions, and the bill would extend those benefits for only 2015 retroactively.

In recent tax years, taxpayers have faced a great deal of uncertainty in determining whether they can continually and regularly depend on tax incentives to help them lower their taxes. At the beginning of 2013, Congress enacted the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which extended 51 provisions for two years retroactively through the beginning of 2012 and through 2013.

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