estate tax

About The Internal Revenue Code

Federal tax law begins (and ends!) with the Internal Revenue Code (IRC or “Tax Code”), which was enacted by Congress in Title 26 of the United States Code (26 U.S.C. et seq). The Tax Code, formally known as the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, contains the federal domestic statutory tax law of the United States.

The Internal Revenue Code is organized by such topics as income tax, payroll tax, estate tax, gift tax, and excise tax. The Tax Code also contains rules for procedure and administration. As everyone soon finds out after earning their first paycheck, if not sooner, the agency responsible for administering its rules and associated regulations is the Internal Revenue Service, aka IRS.

Trump Will Kill The Estate Tax – Why Does This Matter To You?

Donald Trump has promised to repeal the estate tax. Why does this matter? Well, it really may not matter…for that matter. For the few taxpayers who expect to pay the estate tax, they no longer will have to create tax-exempt organizations to eliminate large sources of tax revenue. For the remainder, it really won’t matter. What will matter is what type of tax rules and regulations replace it.

Trump’s Tax Plan Then And Now, Part 2

Every American taxpayer is waiting to see what specific tax plan Donald Trump will implement as President of the United States. The first part of this blog addressed the differences between Trump’s 2015 proposed tax plan and his current 2016 tax plan. While there are differences, there are, of course, the constants in Trump’s tax proposals, which demonstrate the tax policies that Trump has emphasized as important from the beginning of his presidential candidacy.

The Estate Tax Is Dead. What This Means For The Rest Of The Living

The original purpose for the enactment of the estate tax in 1916 was to be a temporary tax used to pay off the war bonds of WWI. One hundred years later and it’s still around. However, Donald Trump has pledged to repeal the estate tax, although presidential candidates promising to repeal the estate tax is standard campaign rhetoric in every election. However, this time around, with the incoming Trump Administration, it may be more than just talk.

The Most Overlooked Tax Deductions, Part 8

This is the eighth part of our series of blogs on the most overlooked tax deductions. In this blog, we will attempt to summarize the first half or group of prior articles in the series. For a more a detailed overview, see the blogs themselves!

JOB & MOVING DEDUCTIONS

Job Search Expenses

As long as the position of employment sought is in the same line of work as a current or most recent job, job search expenses may be deducted as miscellaneous expenses if itemized.

Moving Expenses for a First Job

Some Things To Know About New York State Tax

It’s not news that most people complain about having to pay taxes. New Yorkers seem to especially complain about their state and local tax burden. The Tax Foundation, with a database that currently covers the years 1977-2012, interprets the tax burden of individual taxpayers by measuring what they actually spend in local and state taxes. Its. According to its rankings of states with the highest state and local tax burdens, Americans paid an average rate of 9.9 percent in state and local taxes in 2012. Further, the state with the highest state-local tax burden was New York at 12.7 %. In fact, the top three states – New York, New Jersey and Connecticut – have been ranked as the top three in this category since 2005. Not surprisingly, New York’s tax laws are relatively complex compared to other U.S. states. Here are some things to know about taxes in the Empire State.

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