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Dealing With The IRS Part 2

Dealing with the IRS may be one of the most intimidating thoughts or notions for any American taxpayer. Everyone wants to know how to deal with the IRS when the time comes. Here are some tips if a taxpayer receives a notice from the IRS, thus necessitating some contact with the IRS.

The IRS typically sends a notice or a letter for a variety of reasons, including information about some specific issue related to a federal tax return or account, or information about changes to such an account. A notice may also request further information about some tax-related issue or request a payment.

Why You Should File Past Due Tax Returns, Now!

Taxpayers that have failed to file tax returns for some extended period of time should strongly consider doing so immediately. Even if taxpayers have filed for an extension, time is of the essence to avoid costly penalties as the IRS assesses failure to file (FTF) and failure to pay (FTP) penalties in this situation.

The failure to file penalty is assessed at a rate of 5% per month or partial month up to a maximum rate of 25%. The failure to pay penalty is assessed at a rate of 0.5% per month or partial month up to a maximum rate of 25%. If the IRS assesses both the FTF and FTP penalties, the FTF penalty is reduced by the amount of the FTP penalty.

Can New York State Audit My Federal Tax Return?

Can the state of New York audit a federal tax return? Well, there’s nothing to prevent it from doing so. Often, a New York taxpayer may claim a state tax refund based upon the result of some calculation on the taxpayer’s federal tax return. Then, a New York state auditor questions the result and decides to inquire further by auditing the taxpayer’s state and federal return. At the Thorgood Law Firm, we’ve been seeing such audits occur much more frequently in the last few years.

IRS Audits – What Are My Chances?

IRS Audits – What Are My Chances?It’s considered by many taxpayers to be one of the most frightening events that could happen related to their everyday business affairs. What is this frightening event? An IRS audit, of course. But is a tax audit really that scary in real life? The numbers reveal that only 1% of all taxpayers experience an audit, and of this one percent, about one in five result in a meeting with the IRS.

Presently, the IRS audits half as many taxpayers as it did five years ago. However, the amount of tax recovered per audit has increased. The IRS uses an elaborate computer selection process, auditing only those returns which will almost certainly yield some adjustment.

You’ve filed your tax return, how long does the IRS have to audit you?

You’ve filed your tax return, how long does the IRS have to audit you?You’ve filed all of your tax returns, and because of your level of income you find yourself in the class of taxpayers whose return is more likely to trigger an IRS audit. So you wonder, how long does the IRS now have to audit you?

Due to disclosure requirements, the IRS makes contact with a taxpayer selected for an audit by telephone or mail only.  When returns are filed, they are compared against norms for similar returns. These norms are developed from audits of a statistically valid random sample of returns, selected as part of the National Research Program conducted by the IRS to update return selection information.

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