adjusted gross income

How Will The Trump Tax Plan Affect You?

How will incoming President Donald Trump’s tax plan affect individual and corporate taxpayers alike? Trump has promised on several occasions that his new tax scheme will help most individual, business and corporate taxpayers save taxes. Some of the plan’s provisions will lower the business tax rate from 35 percent to 15 percent. He says that he will reduce the seven individual tax brackets that are currently used to only three. His plan adapts the current rates for qualified capital gains and dividends to these three new brackets. Also of significance is that the new tax plan will eliminate the net investment income tax and the individual and corporate alternative minimum taxes.

Most Confusing Parts Of The Income Tax Code, Part 3: Retirement Accounts

Many provisions of the Internal Revenue Code are complicated. Proper interpretation of the rules and regulations contained in these provisions requires the assistance of an experienced and knowledgeable tax professional. The third part of our series about the most confusing provisions of the Internal Revenue Code addresses retirement accounts.

There are over a dozen different tax-advantaged retirement savings accounts, each with its own set of rules governing contributions, distributions and when money may be withdrawn without incurring any penalties.

Why Is It Confusing?

  • There are a large list of incentives from which to choose

The Effects Of Trump’s Tax Plan On Individuals And Businesses

Donald Trump’s most current tax plan promises to save taxes for most individual taxpayers. One way is the elimination of the alternative minimum tax. What are some other ways? Trump’s tax plan:

  • Adapts the current rates for qualified capital gains and dividends to the new brackets.
  • Eliminates the head of household filing status.
  • Eliminates the Net Investment Income Tax.
  • Increases the standard deduction from $6,300 to $15,000 for singles and from $12,600 to $30,000 for married couples filing jointly.

Taxes And Medical Expenses

Taxpayers that itemize​ personal deductions instead of claiming the standard deduction may deduct qualifying medical expenses to the extent that such expenses exceed 10 percent of adjusted gross income (“AGI”). Taxpayers that are 65 years or older, or turned 65 during the tax year, may deduct unreimbursed medical care expenses that exceed 7.5% of AGI. This threshold amount remains at 7.5% of adjusted gross income for these taxpayers until Dec. 31, 2016. I.R.C. §213(f).

Deductions And Long-Term Care Insurance

A long-term care insurance premium, or a part thereof, may be deductible from federal income taxes as a medical expense. Acknowledging that it can’t assume the primary role in paying for Americans’ long-term health care, the federal government offers tax incentives to encourage middle-aged and older taxpayers to assume responsibility for their future health care needs. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) included provisions for favorable tax treatment of Long-Term Care insurance (LTCi) contracts that meet statutory qualifications.

Deduction Thresholds And Bunching Expenses

All of us as taxpayers continually think we have a lot of expenses that we can itemize and deduct to help reduce our respective tax bills. But they come, they go, all for naught and no effect. The problem usually arises from the fact that our costs regularly fall just short of the required income thresholds for some categories of deductions. One solution is “bunching expenses,” which is a term used to describe incurring as many expenses as possible in a particular category during a particular tax year. Of course, doing this in one tax year will usually significantly diminish any chance of repeating it the following year.

What You Need to Know About Deducting State and Local Taxes

Taxpayers that itemize deductions on Schedule A, (and file Form 1040) can deduct the cost of state income taxes on their federal tax return. The ability to deduct the full cost of these taxes  has its obvious advantages. Taxpayers may either claim such a deduction from state and local income taxes or state and local sales taxes, but not both. Basically, to be deductible, the tax must be imposed on a taxpayer and must have been paid during the particular tax year. Taxpayers that elect to deduct state and local general sales taxes, may use either their actual expenses or the optional sales tax tables.

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