Married Filing Separately

OF SALT, TAXES & MORTGAGES…

OF SALT, TAXES AND MORTGAGES…

Do you pay State and Local Taxes (SALT)? If you live in any of New York, California, New Jersey, Connecticut, or any other of the so-called high-tax states, you likely pay more than the national average in SALT.  Prior to 2018, you were allowed to itemize all of your SALT payments on your federal tax returns.  However, the recently passed law, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, curbs the deductibility and otherwise affects you disproportionately, compared with the rest of the country.   The changes to the deduction of State and Local Taxes (SALT) on federal tax returns are generally as follows

AN ANALYSIS OF THE TAX CUTS AND JOBS ACT

January 2018

 

AN ANALYSIS OF THE TAX CUTS AND JOBS ACT

On December 22, 2017, after much, well-publicized legislative skirmishes, President Donald Trump signed into law H.R. 1, otherwise known as the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.”   Provisions affecting individuals are generally effective beginning December 31, 2017 and expire on December 31, 2025.  Most business-related provisions are permanent and are effective beginning December 31, 2017.

This new law is, by all accounts, the most significant revisions to the U.S. tax code since 1986, affecting almost all individual and business taxpayers.   Our firm’s general assessment of the new law will therefore be a two-part series: this first part covers changes to individual taxpayers, and the second part will cover changes to business taxpayers.

Answers to FAQs for Individuals of the Same Sex Who Are Married Under State Law

Here are some answers to frequently asked questions relating to the tax consequences for individuals participating in a same-sex marriage.

*When are individuals of the same sex lawfully married for federal tax purposes?

For federal tax purposes, state or foreign law determines whether individuals are married.

*Can same-sex spouses file federal tax returns using a married filing jointly or married filing separately status? Yes.

  • For tax year 2013 and going forward, same-sex spouses generally must file using a married filing separately or jointly filing status.

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