Lifetime Learning Tax Credit

Most Confusing Parts Of The Income Tax Code, Part 4: Education Tax Incentives

Many provisions of the Internal Revenue Code are complicated. Proper interpretation of the rules and regulations contained in these provisions requires the assistance of an experienced and knowledgeable tax professional. The fourth part of our series about the most confusing provisions of the Internal Revenue Code addresses education tax incentives.

Why Is It Confusing?

  • There are a large list of incentives from which to choose
  • New stricter requirements to establish eligibility for some incentives
  • Determining eligibility is a complicated, arduous, lengthy process
  • Difficulty in determining the correct and appropriate benefit

The Most Overlooked Tax Deductions, Part 9

This is the ninth part of our series of blogs on the most overlooked tax deductions. In this blog, we will attempt to summarize the second half or group of prior articles in the series. For a more a detailed overview, see the blogs themselves!

HEALTH, CHILD CARE, AND CHARITY DEDUCTIONS

Deduction of Medicare Premiums for the Self-Employed
Self-employed individuals who continue to operate their own businesses after qualifying for Medicare can deduct their Medicare Part B and Medicare Part D premiums, plus the cost of supplemental Medicare policies or the cost of a Medicare Advantage plan, regardless of whether or not he or she itemizes.

Tax Benefits For Education Part 1

This is the first part of our multi-part blog on tax benefits for education. Any present or former (or future) student should utilize the knowledge, experience and expertise of the tax professionals at the Thorgood Law Firm to ensure that they take full advantage all the credits and deductions that the law allows for students of higher education.

Tax credits, deductions and savings plans offer taxpayers ways to reduce their expenses for higher education.

  • A tax credit may reduce the amount of potential income tax.
  • A deduction reduces the amount of income that is subject to tax, thus reducing the amount of tax paid.

To Be or Not To Be? Married Filing Jointly or Married Filing Separately?

Married couples have the option to file jointly or separately on their federal income tax returns. Undoubtedly, married couples during tax season have asked each other if they are filing advantageously, whether currently filing jointly or separately. The IRS strongly encourages most couples to file joint tax returns by extending several tax breaks to those who file together. In the vast majority of cases, it’s best for married couples to file jointly, but there may be a few instances when it’s better to submit separate returns.

Proving Education Tax Break Eligibility In 2016

Proving Education Tax Break Eligibility In 2016The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 extended the American Opportunity Tax Credit (AOTC) through December 31, 2017. This tax credit assists with the cost of higher education expenses such as tuition, course materials and other certain eligible fees for four years, which differs from the Hope scholarship credit because the credit may be claimed for four years instead of the two allowed under the Hope credit.

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