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President Trump’s 2005 Tax Returns – What It Tells Us

President Trump’s 2005 Tax Return – What It Tells Us

Yesterday, Tuesday March 14, 2017, while most of the New England area was buried in snow, MSNBC published President Trump’s 2005 income tax return – or at least the first two pages of it.  What does the return tell us and what does it not?

The Basics – We know he had a positive income in the amount of $152,737,866 and $103,201,242 in tax write-offs.  He paid a total of $38,435,451 in taxes for the year.

About Trump’s Tax Plan

It remains to be seen the specific tax plan that Donald Trump will implement as President of the United States. The effects of Donald Trump’s tax plan will depend on taxpayers’ income and tax planning. Some think that Trump’s plan will significantly reduce income and corporate taxes, and eliminate the estate tax. It seems the plan’s largest effect on individual taxpayers will be to reduce the top tax bracket 6.6 percentage points from 39.6 percent to 33 percent.

The Effects Of Trump’s Tax Plan On Individuals And Businesses

Donald Trump’s most current tax plan promises to save taxes for most individual taxpayers. One way is the elimination of the alternative minimum tax. What are some other ways? Trump’s tax plan:

  • Adapts the current rates for qualified capital gains and dividends to the new brackets.
  • Eliminates the head of household filing status.
  • Eliminates the Net Investment Income Tax.
  • Increases the standard deduction from $6,300 to $15,000 for singles and from $12,600 to $30,000 for married couples filing jointly.

Can You Defer Your 2016 Income To 2017?

The end of the year is the perfect time for taxpayers to make financial adjustments to lower their tax bill for the current year. Making adjustments to income may help reduce tax liability. Income is typically taxed in the year it is received, however, if you don’t have to pay tax today and may pay it tomorrow, why not? Deferring income is an excellent strategy to lower an annual tax bill. However, only taxpayers that expect their tax bracket to remain the same or decrease to a lower bracket should defer income.

The (Trump’s) Net Operating Loss (NOL), Explained

At the beginning of October, the New York Times released pages from Donald Trump’s Connecticut, New Jersey and New York 1995 tax returns, apparently reflecting that the Donald declared “other income” of negative $916 million and was prepared to forego any federal income tax liability for up to 18 years by carrying forward this “net operating loss” (NOL). So what is a net operating loss?

Tax Benefits of Supporting Your Parents

Did you know you could be responsible for your parents’ unpaid bills? Ever heard of Filial Responsibility Laws?  Well, these are laws obligating you to provide financial support for your indigent parents.  Yes, obligated under law.  According to the National Center for Policy Analysis, 21 states across the country (including states like Connecticut, New Jersey and Massachusetts) allow for a civil action to obtain financial support for indigent parents.   At least 12 states may impose criminal penalties on children who refuse to support their parents.  Though rarely enforced, these laws may be dusted off by states looking to save money on Medicaid bills.

What To Do If You Haven’t Received Your Refund

Of course, none of us “prefer” to pay taxes. Once we do pay our taxes, if we expect a refund, we hardly exhibit any patience awaiting it in the mail. But the IRS is a mega-bureaucracy, which means that things get lost, overlooked, mishandled, and, well I shudder to think. Thus, delays are not altogether uncommon, and failures to process and mail returns actually occur, albeit infrequently. So what do you do if you haven’t received your tax refund?

Federal Tax Refunds May Be Delayed In 2017

Earlier this year, the Internal Revenue Service announced it is beginning protocols for processing tax returns using the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC). The IRS is sharing this information to help taxpayers, tax preparers, and other tax professionals prepare for the opening weeks of the 2017 filing season. The IRS is attempting to ensure taxpayers receive a correct and accurate refund.

The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (PATH Act) was enacted in December of 2015, which made several changes to the tax law affecting taxpayers with families. This change begins Jan. 1, 2017, and therefore may affect some returns filed early in 2017.

Top Tax Deductions for Seniors and Retirees

Here are some of the most important tax deductions for seniors and retirees. 

  1. Higher standard deduction.

Any taxpayer that is 65 and older by December 31 of the tax year is entitled to a higher standard deduction. Taxpayers may take the higher standard deduction if a spouse is age 65 or older and together they file a joint return. Also, the higher standard deduction may be taken if the taxpayer files a separate return and can claim an exemption for a spouse because the spouse had no gross income and can’t be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. 

The Most Overlooked Tax Deductions, Part 5

Many taxpayers overlook the long list of deductions that they may take when completing and filing their tax returns. The tax professionals at the Thorgood Law Firm can help ensure that all taxpayers take advantage of any and all deductions that may apply to them.  Here is the fifth part of our multi-part blog on the most overlooked tax deductions:

LEGAL INCOME & FEES AS DEDUCTIONS

Jury pay paid to employer

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