Income Tax

State Individual Tax Climate: Connecticut

The Tax Foundation recently conducted a study of the tax climates in each of the fifty states and then rated and ranked them based on five categories: corporate tax, individual income, sales tax, unemployment insurance tax, and property tax. The Tax Foundation’s rankings are designed to show how well state tax systems are structured, rather than simply rank the states by the amount of taxes assessed.

Connecticut finished 43rd in overall tax climate and it ranked in the individual tax categories as follows: 32 (corporate tax), 37 (individual income tax), 27 (sales tax), 21 (unemployment insurance tax), and 49 (property tax).

Which State Has The Best Tax Climate?

The Tax Foundation is an independent tax policy nonprofit organization that has studied and researched tax policy since 1937. It reviewed the 2017 tax climates in each of the fifty states and ranked them overall based on five categories: corporate tax, individual income, sales tax, unemployment insurance tax, and property tax. In the near future, we will address the state tax climates of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut.

The purpose of the Tax Foundation State Business Tax Climate Index is to enable business owners, policymakers, and taxpayers evaluate how their states’ tax systems compare to others. The Tax Foundation’s rankings are designed to show how well state tax systems are structured, rather than simply rank the states by the amount of taxes assessed.

History of The Income Tax In The U.S. Part 4: 2008-2016

Here is a quick summary of the history of the income tax in the United States up to the Obama presidency. Please see past blogs on the history of the income tax in the United States for more information.

Taxes were not much a part of our nation’s early history until the high cost of the War of 1812 brought about a need for revenue at the federal level, which resulted in the implementation of the nation’s first sales taxes. Fifty years later, Abraham Lincoln enacted emergency measures to pay for the Civil War.

History of The Income Tax In The U.S. Part 3: 2000-2008

Ronald Reagan ran for president on a platform of tax reform. In the fall of 1986, President Reagan signed into law the Tax Reform Act of 1986, one of the most far-reaching reforms of the U.S. tax system. More than ten years later in 1997, President Clinton signed the Taxpayer Relief Act which reduced taxes by $152 and implemented more than 800 changes to the Tax Code rules and regulations, including a $500 per child tax credit, capital gains tax reduction, Roth IRAs and tax incentives for education. Following the passage of these major tax bills, significant tax legislation was also enacted during the presidency of George W. Bush. This blog examining the tax history of the U.S. will examine the legislation enacted during his time in office.

History of The Income Tax In The U.S. Part 2: 1980-1999

As perhaps would be expected, taxes were not much a part of our nation’s early history. Then the high cost of the War of 1812 brought about a need for revenue at the federal level and the nation’s first sales taxes were implemented. Fifty years later, Abraham Lincoln enacted emergency measures to pay for Civil War. In 1954, the 875-page Internal Revenue Code of 1954 was formulated. It was perhaps the most monumental overhaul of the federal income tax system to date. In 1969, the Tax Reform Act contained major amendments to the 1954 Tax Code.

Reagan-Bush Era

History of The Income Tax In The U.S., Part 1: The First Two Hundred Years

Our nation has existed since 1776. Some wonder whether the income tax has been around for as long. As perhaps would be expected, taxes were not much a part of our nation’s early history. After all, the Boston Tea Party involved a protest over a tariff, the Tea Act of 1773, imposed by the English crown. In the period directly preceding the 19th century, the United States imposed internal taxes on distilled spirits, tobacco, refined sugar, slaves, carriages, corporate bonds, snuff, and property sold at auction.

The 19th Century

The IRS Releases 2017 Inflation Adjustments

Now that we’re well into the New Year, taxpayers should know 2017’s inflation adjustments for several tax provisions set forth in Rev. Proc. 2016-55. These adjustments apply to tax years beginning in 2017 and transactions or events occurring during the 2017 calendar year. Many affect estate planners and expatriates.

*The 2017 taxable income thresholds on trusts and estates under § 1(e) are:

If Taxable Income is: The Tax is:
Not over $  2,550 15% of the taxable income
Over      $  2,550 but not over $ 6,000 $   382.50  plus 25% of excess over    $ 2,550

Trump’s Tax Plan Then And Now, Part 1

What specific tax plan will Donald Trump implement as President of the United States? Trump’s initial plan released in September 2015, set forth four tax brackets of 0%, 10%, 20% and 25%. In October, just prior to the election, he released a new plan that adopted the House Republicans’ approach using three tax brackets, 12%, 25% and 33%. Either plan seems to adopt aspects of the tax reform pursued by House Republicans, as the president-elect moves closer to the Republicans’ tax agenda. Here’s a look at Trump’s tax plan then and now.

President Trump’s 2005 Tax Returns – What It Tells Us

President Trump’s 2005 Tax Return – What It Tells Us

Yesterday, Tuesday March 14, 2017, while most of the New England area was buried in snow, MSNBC published President Trump’s 2005 income tax return – or at least the first two pages of it.  What does the return tell us and what does it not?

The Basics – We know he had a positive income in the amount of $152,737,866 and $103,201,242 in tax write-offs.  He paid a total of $38,435,451 in taxes for the year.

About Trump’s Tax Plan

It remains to be seen the specific tax plan that Donald Trump will implement as President of the United States. The effects of Donald Trump’s tax plan will depend on taxpayers’ income and tax planning. Some think that Trump’s plan will significantly reduce income and corporate taxes, and eliminate the estate tax. It seems the plan’s largest effect on individual taxpayers will be to reduce the top tax bracket 6.6 percentage points from 39.6 percent to 33 percent.

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