Delinquent Taxes

Seven Deadly Tax Sins

7 Deadly Tax Sins

When it comes to the IRS, some bad acts are worse than others.  We have compiled below the top ones to avoid at all costs.  However, if you should find yourself in the middle of one, you should certainly call tax attorneys to get you out of the bad situation (yes, it is a bad situation).

The “What Ifs” for Struggling Taxpayers

Many of life’s events such as losing a job, foreclosure of a home or even forgiveness of a debt impact the payment of taxes. The tax law offers hope in these situations. As an example, if a taxpayer’s income decreases, he or she may be eligible for certain tax credits, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit. In this blog, We will present a list of quick answers to life event situations that have a potential impact on an individual’s tax burden. For more information see our blogs: Part 1 – What If: Job Related Life Events and Struggling Taxpayers; and Part 2 – What If: Debt Related Life Events and Struggling Taxpayers.

What You Need To Do If You Haven’t Been Filing FBARs

Taxpayers are required to file an FBAR (Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts) if they had a financial interest in or signature authority over at least one financial account located outside of the United States; and the aggregate value of all of these foreign financial accounts exceeds $10,000 at any time during the calendar year for which the taxpayer is reporting.

The FBAR is a calendar year report and must be filed on or before June 30 (with no extensions granted) of the year following the calendar year being reported. But what do you do if you are required to file FBARs and you haven’t been filing them? An experienced tax professional like one of the many at the Thorgood Law Firm can help all taxpayers resolve their problems with delinquent FBARs.

Part 2 – What If: Debt Related Life Events And Struggling Taxpayers

If you have any type of financial difficulty, keep in mind that there’s a tax impact to events such as job loss or foreclosure. Such consequences may not necessarily be predominantly negative. For example, if your income decreased, you may be newly eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit or other tax credits, which is a good thing.

Of the utmost importance when facing some financial obstacle is to contact the IRS immediately if you believe that you may have trouble paying your tax bill. Please see our blog You Can’t Pay Your Tax Bill in Full  You Have Options…An experienced and knowledgeable tax attorney may help ease any financial burden. Remember that to avoid additional penalties, you also should always file a tax return even if you are unable to pay.

Part 1 – What If: Job Related Life Events And Struggling Taxpayers

If you have any type of financial difficulty, keep in mind that there’s a tax impact to events such as job loss or foreclosure. Such consequences may not necessarily be predominantly negative. For example, if your income decreased, you may be newly eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit or other tax credits, which is a good thing.

Of the utmost importance when facing some financial obstacle is to contact the IRS immediately if you believe that you may have trouble paying your tax bill. Please see our blog You Can’t Pay Your Tax Bill in Full  You Have Options…An experienced and knowledgeable tax attorney may help ease any financial burden. Remember that to avoid additional penalties, you also should always file a tax return even if you are unable to pay.

Negligence or Tax Fraud? What is “Negligent” and What Is “Willful” Conduct to the IRS?

What does the IRS consider to be negligent or non-wilful conduct when it comes to tax-related activity like filing income tax returns and making deductions? What does it consider wilful conduct? When is such activity tax fraud?

Tax fraud is a general term which is defined as taxpayer’s intent to defraud the government by not paying taxes that the taxpayer knows are lawfully due. Tax fraud can be punishable either civilly, criminally, or both. Under federal law, civil violations are primarily located in Title 26 and criminal violations mainly in Title 18, respectively, of the United States Code (“U.S.C.”).

WHAT IS AN OFFER-IN-COMPROMISE?

Taxpayers that are unable to pay their tax bill have several options. All is not lost. Taxpayers who can’t pay their tax liability or who create a financial hardship by paying this liability may take advantage of a federal tax program in which they utilize a mechanism known as an “Offer In Compromise” to resolve and settle these tax problems with finality. The Offer in Compromise (or “OIC” in IRS and legal jargon) program is not for everyone and the IRS advises that taxpayers explore all other payment options before submitting an OIC. An experienced tax professional is absolutely essential in all steps of the process of formulating, making, and awaiting the IRS to accept, an OIC.

I HAVENT FILED A RETURN IN LAST 6 YEARS. HOW CAN I CATCH UP?

It is estimated that 7 million taxpayers fail to file their tax returns each year, which is approximately 5% of all filers. The Internal Revenue Service released results of a study that indicated that the federal government loses $28 billion annually. Unfortunately (for the IRS, perhaps not for the non-filers), the IRS has never had the resources to adequately track and keep record of these non-filings.

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