Deductions

President Trump’s 2005 Tax Returns – What It Tells Us

President Trump’s 2005 Tax Return – What It Tells Us

Yesterday, Tuesday March 14, 2017, while most of the New England area was buried in snow, MSNBC published President Trump’s 2005 income tax return – or at least the first two pages of it.  What does the return tell us and what does it not?

The Basics – We know he had a positive income in the amount of $152,737,866 and $103,201,242 in tax write-offs.  He paid a total of $38,435,451 in taxes for the year.

The Effects Of Trump’s Tax Plan On Individuals And Businesses

Donald Trump’s most current tax plan promises to save taxes for most individual taxpayers. One way is the elimination of the alternative minimum tax. What are some other ways? Trump’s tax plan:

  • Adapts the current rates for qualified capital gains and dividends to the new brackets.
  • Eliminates the head of household filing status.
  • Eliminates the Net Investment Income Tax.
  • Increases the standard deduction from $6,300 to $15,000 for singles and from $12,600 to $30,000 for married couples filing jointly.

The (Trump’s) Net Operating Loss (NOL), Explained

At the beginning of October, the New York Times released pages from Donald Trump’s Connecticut, New Jersey and New York 1995 tax returns, apparently reflecting that the Donald declared “other income” of negative $916 million and was prepared to forego any federal income tax liability for up to 18 years by carrying forward this “net operating loss” (NOL). So what is a net operating loss?

Tax Implications of Reverse Mortgages

In the last fifteen years or so, television viewers, especially those watching late at night, have been inundated with commercials for reverse mortgages. A reverse mortgage allows a mortgagor, 62 or older, to continue living and retain title in the home; while receiving back his or her equity in the form of a monthly cash payment. The original home owner continues to pay for property insurance, taxes, and maintenance. If a home owner moves, sells, or dies, he or she (or his or her estate) must repay the loan.

Tax Benefits of Supporting Your Parents

Did you know you could be responsible for your parents’ unpaid bills? Ever heard of Filial Responsibility Laws?  Well, these are laws obligating you to provide financial support for your indigent parents.  Yes, obligated under law.  According to the National Center for Policy Analysis, 21 states across the country (including states like Connecticut, New Jersey and Massachusetts) allow for a civil action to obtain financial support for indigent parents.   At least 12 states may impose criminal penalties on children who refuse to support their parents.  Though rarely enforced, these laws may be dusted off by states looking to save money on Medicaid bills.

Your Business Loses Money; Tax Benefits or Concerns?

I’m often asked by nervous new business owners if they can recover a tax refund for a business loss. Receiving a tax benefit from a business loss depends on the type of entity formed and whether the investment in the business is “at risk” in whole or in part. It also depends on the presence of other income.

Owners of a corporation are not taxed directly on business profits and losses because the corporation’s taxes are taxed separately. For other types of enterprises, business income and loss passes through to the owner’s personal tax return. These business types are:

The Most Overlooked Tax Deductions, Part 8

This is the eighth part of our series of blogs on the most overlooked tax deductions. In this blog, we will attempt to summarize the first half or group of prior articles in the series. For a more a detailed overview, see the blogs themselves!

JOB & MOVING DEDUCTIONS

Job Search Expenses

As long as the position of employment sought is in the same line of work as a current or most recent job, job search expenses may be deducted as miscellaneous expenses if itemized.

Moving Expenses for a First Job

Finally! Congress Enacts Tax Extends Part 5

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016, enacted Dec. 18, 2015, extends a long list of expired tax provisions into the future. Unlike past extension legislation, Congress extended many provisions permanently. In more traditional fashion, some of the others were extended for five years, and many for two years. The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that the total cost of the tax provisions in the bill will be $622 billion over 10 years. Without Congress extending these various provisions, millions of Americans were in danger of losing these beneficial tax breaks by 2017.

Here are some provisions for individual taxpayers that were extended by Congress for two years:

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