Child and Dependent Care Credit

Trump’s Tax Plan Then And Now, Part 2

Every American taxpayer is waiting to see what specific tax plan Donald Trump will implement as President of the United States. The first part of this blog addressed the differences between Trump’s 2015 proposed tax plan and his current 2016 tax plan. While there are differences, there are, of course, the constants in Trump’s tax proposals, which demonstrate the tax policies that Trump has emphasized as important from the beginning of his presidential candidacy.

About Trump’s Tax Plan

It remains to be seen the specific tax plan that Donald Trump will implement as President of the United States. The effects of Donald Trump’s tax plan will depend on taxpayers’ income and tax planning. Some think that Trump’s plan will significantly reduce income and corporate taxes, and eliminate the estate tax. It seems the plan’s largest effect on individual taxpayers will be to reduce the top tax bracket 6.6 percentage points from 39.6 percent to 33 percent.

Seven Deadly Tax Sins

7 Deadly Tax Sins

When it comes to the IRS, some bad acts are worse than others.  We have compiled below the top ones to avoid at all costs.  However, if you should find yourself in the middle of one, you should certainly call tax attorneys to get you out of the bad situation (yes, it is a bad situation).

Tax Benefits of Supporting Your Parents

Did you know you could be responsible for your parents’ unpaid bills? Ever heard of Filial Responsibility Laws?  Well, these are laws obligating you to provide financial support for your indigent parents.  Yes, obligated under law.  According to the National Center for Policy Analysis, 21 states across the country (including states like Connecticut, New Jersey and Massachusetts) allow for a civil action to obtain financial support for indigent parents.   At least 12 states may impose criminal penalties on children who refuse to support their parents.  Though rarely enforced, these laws may be dusted off by states looking to save money on Medicaid bills.

Federal Tax Refunds May Be Delayed In 2017

Earlier this year, the Internal Revenue Service announced it is beginning protocols for processing tax returns using the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC). The IRS is sharing this information to help taxpayers, tax preparers, and other tax professionals prepare for the opening weeks of the 2017 filing season. The IRS is attempting to ensure taxpayers receive a correct and accurate refund.

The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (PATH Act) was enacted in December of 2015, which made several changes to the tax law affecting taxpayers with families. This change begins Jan. 1, 2017, and therefore may affect some returns filed early in 2017.

Claiming Summer Camp Expenses On Your Tax Returns

Keeping children busy and entertained during the summer months when school is out is no easy task for parents. One alternative is sending the youngsters to summer camp, which is typically not a small expense. However, tClaiming Summer Camp Expenses On Your Tax Returns

During the school year, working parents have the luxury of not having to find someone to care for their younger children during normal school hours. In this case, children only need care during the hours between the time school ends and when a parent arrives home from work, which may be two to three hours at the most. However, during the summer this changes when school end and parents must find day-long care for their children. Many parents send their kids to camp during the summer to solve this problem. Is there any tax relief for parents in this situation?

How Your Job Hunt Could Lower Your Taxes

For taxpayers seeking a new job in their same line of work, a tax deduction for some job search expenses may be available. First and foremost, these expenses must be related to a job search in a taxpayer’s current occupation, as expenses related to a search for a job in a new occupation may not be deducted. If an employer or third party provides reimbursement for the expense, it may not be deducted.

Here are some expenses that may be deducted:

  1. Employment and job placement agency fees;
  2. Costs of preparing, copying and mailing résumés to prospective employers;

Finally! Congress Enacts Tax Extends Part 1

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016, enacted Dec. 18, 2015, extends a long list of expired tax provisions into the future. Unlike past extension legislation, Congress extended many provisions permanently. In more traditional fashion, some of the others were extended for five years, and many for two years. The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that the total cost of the tax provisions in the bill will be $622 billion over 10 years. Without Congress extending these various provisions, millions of Americans were in danger of losing these beneficial tax breaks by 2017.

Tax Benefits For Disabled Taxpayers

The tax professionals at the Thorgood Law Firm can help any taxpayer pinpoint all of the tax benefits that are applicable to his or her situation or status. The following are some of the tax benefits that may assist disabled taxpayers.

  1. Credit for the Elderly or Disabled: This credit is generally available to certain taxpayers who are sixty-five (65) and older as well as to certain disabled taxpayers who are younger than sixty-five (65) but are on permanent and total disability.

The Most Overlooked Tax Deductions, Part 4

The Most Overlooked Tax Deductions, Part 4Many taxpayers overlook the long list of deductions that they may take when completing and filing their tax returns. The IRS has estimated that millions of taxpayers overpay their taxes each year mainly because they fail to avail themselves of all of the possible deductions. The tax professionals at the Thorgood Law Firm can help ensure that all taxpayers take advantage of any and all deductions that may apply to them. Here is the fourth part of our multi-part blog on the most overlooked tax deductions:

HEALTH, CHILD CARE, AND CHARITY DEDUCTIONS

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