Business Expenses

Seven Deadly Tax Sins

7 Deadly Tax Sins

When it comes to the IRS, some bad acts are worse than others.  We have compiled below the top ones to avoid at all costs.  However, if you should find yourself in the middle of one, you should certainly call tax attorneys to get you out of the bad situation (yes, it is a bad situation).

Your Business Loses Money; Tax Benefits or Concerns?

I’m often asked by nervous new business owners if they can recover a tax refund for a business loss. Receiving a tax benefit from a business loss depends on the type of entity formed and whether the investment in the business is “at risk” in whole or in part. It also depends on the presence of other income.

Owners of a corporation are not taxed directly on business profits and losses because the corporation’s taxes are taxed separately. For other types of enterprises, business income and loss passes through to the owner’s personal tax return. These business types are:

Cutting Someone Else’s Losses: Conway Twitty & Twittyburger

Harold L. Jenkins, better known as the legendary country music singer, Conway Twitty, was able to accomplish something few before and after him have accomplshed, or even attempted for that matter. That is, pay back those who lost money as a result of an enterprise he sponsored. In a surprise turn of events, Twitty was also able to deduct these repayments from his federal taxes as ordinary and necessary expenses of his business.

Finally! Congress Enacts Tax Extends Part 5

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016, enacted Dec. 18, 2015, extends a long list of expired tax provisions into the future. Unlike past extension legislation, Congress extended many provisions permanently. In more traditional fashion, some of the others were extended for five years, and many for two years. The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that the total cost of the tax provisions in the bill will be $622 billion over 10 years. Without Congress extending these various provisions, millions of Americans were in danger of losing these beneficial tax breaks by 2017.

Here are some provisions for individual taxpayers that were extended by Congress for two years:

Finally! Congress Enacts Tax Extends Part 2

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016, enacted Dec. 18, 2015, extends a long list of expired tax provisions into the future. Unlike past extension legislation, Congress extended many provisions permanently. In more traditional fashion, some of the others were extended for five years, and many for two years. The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that the total cost of the tax provisions in the bill will be $622 billion over 10 years.

These tax breaks include but are not limited to savings for teachers, parking and transit benefits, and certain charitable contributions which will be discussed in this blog. Without Congress extending these various provisions, millions of Americans were in danger of losing these beneficial tax breaks by 2017.

Top Tax Deductions for Seniors and Retirees

Here are some of the most important tax deductions for seniors and retirees. 

  1. Higher standard deduction.

Any taxpayer that is 65 and older by December 31 of the tax year is entitled to a higher standard deduction. Taxpayers may take the higher standard deduction if a spouse is age 65 or older and together they file a joint return. Also, the higher standard deduction may be taken if the taxpayer files a separate return and can claim an exemption for a spouse because the spouse had no gross income and can’t be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. 

The Most Overlooked Tax Deductions, Part 7

Many taxpayers overlook the long list of deductions that they may take when completing and filing their tax returns. The IRS has estimated that millions of taxpayers overpay their taxes each year mainly because they fail to avail themselves of all of the possible deductions. Here is the seventh part of our multi-part series of blogs on the most overlooked tax deductions:

BUSINESS EXPENSES AS DEDUCTIONS

Bonus Depreciation

When it comes to acquiring new equipment for an enterprise, business owners must regularly stay updated on all current, pertinent tax rules and regulations, which constantly change. The tax professionals at the Thorgood Law Firm can help ensure that all taxpayers take advantage of any and all deductions that may apply to them.

Can You Write Off Your (Expensive) Work Clothes?

Most employers impose a dress code for the office. As a result, there are more than a few members of the American workforce who must purchase items including expensive suits, dresses, shirts, blouses, and shoes to observe an employer’s dress code. Many employees have wondered whether the cost of these clothes, often worn only for work, is deductible at tax time.

Tax Benefits For Education Part 4

This is the fourth part of our multi-part series of blogs on tax benefits for education. Any present or former student should utilize the knowledge, experience and expertise of the tax professionals at the Thorgood Law Firm to ensure that they take advantage all the credits and deductions that the law allows for students of higher education.

Tax credits, deductions and savings plans offer taxpayers ways to reduce their expenses for higher education.

  • A tax credit may reduce the amount of potential income tax.
  • A deduction reduces the amount of income that is subject to tax, thus reducing the amount of tax paid.

Can I Deduct My Law School Tuition?

Many professionals, whether lawyers, accountants or physicians, experience and endure difficult economic times before finally earning their graduate degree. On one hand, the high cost of tuition must be paid, which requires either a significant student loan or form of employment. Yet, graduate school leaves little or no time for anything other than study. After such an economically, physically, and mentally draining ordeal, is there a way to recoup some of the blood, sweat and cash exchanged for a graduate degree? Is tuition for law or graduate school a deductible educational expense?

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