American Opportunity Tax Credit

Most Confusing Parts Of The Income Tax Code, Part 4: Education Tax Incentives

Many provisions of the Internal Revenue Code are complicated. Proper interpretation of the rules and regulations contained in these provisions requires the assistance of an experienced and knowledgeable tax professional. The fourth part of our series about the most confusing provisions of the Internal Revenue Code addresses education tax incentives.

Why Is It Confusing?

  • There are a large list of incentives from which to choose
  • New stricter requirements to establish eligibility for some incentives
  • Determining eligibility is a complicated, arduous, lengthy process
  • Difficulty in determining the correct and appropriate benefit

Federal Tax Refunds May Be Delayed In 2017

Earlier this year, the Internal Revenue Service announced it is beginning protocols for processing tax returns using the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC). The IRS is sharing this information to help taxpayers, tax preparers, and other tax professionals prepare for the opening weeks of the 2017 filing season. The IRS is attempting to ensure taxpayers receive a correct and accurate refund.

The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (PATH Act) was enacted in December of 2015, which made several changes to the tax law affecting taxpayers with families. This change begins Jan. 1, 2017, and therefore may affect some returns filed early in 2017.

The Most Overlooked Tax Deductions, Part 9

This is the ninth part of our series of blogs on the most overlooked tax deductions. In this blog, we will attempt to summarize the second half or group of prior articles in the series. For a more a detailed overview, see the blogs themselves!

HEALTH, CHILD CARE, AND CHARITY DEDUCTIONS

Deduction of Medicare Premiums for the Self-Employed
Self-employed individuals who continue to operate their own businesses after qualifying for Medicare can deduct their Medicare Part B and Medicare Part D premiums, plus the cost of supplemental Medicare policies or the cost of a Medicare Advantage plan, regardless of whether or not he or she itemizes.

Finally! Congress Enacts Tax Extends Part 1

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016, enacted Dec. 18, 2015, extends a long list of expired tax provisions into the future. Unlike past extension legislation, Congress extended many provisions permanently. In more traditional fashion, some of the others were extended for five years, and many for two years. The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that the total cost of the tax provisions in the bill will be $622 billion over 10 years. Without Congress extending these various provisions, millions of Americans were in danger of losing these beneficial tax breaks by 2017.

Tax Benefits For Education Part 1

This is the first part of our multi-part blog on tax benefits for education. Any present or former (or future) student should utilize the knowledge, experience and expertise of the tax professionals at the Thorgood Law Firm to ensure that they take full advantage all the credits and deductions that the law allows for students of higher education.

Tax credits, deductions and savings plans offer taxpayers ways to reduce their expenses for higher education.

  • A tax credit may reduce the amount of potential income tax.
  • A deduction reduces the amount of income that is subject to tax, thus reducing the amount of tax paid.

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