Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT)

President Trump’s 2005 Tax Returns – What It Tells Us

President Trump’s 2005 Tax Return – What It Tells Us

Yesterday, Tuesday March 14, 2017, while most of the New England area was buried in snow, MSNBC published President Trump’s 2005 income tax return – or at least the first two pages of it.  What does the return tell us and what does it not?

The Basics – We know he had a positive income in the amount of $152,737,866 and $103,201,242 in tax write-offs.  He paid a total of $38,435,451 in taxes for the year.

Most Confusing Parts Of The Income Tax Code, Part 2: Alternative Minimum Tax

Many provisions of the Internal Revenue Code are complicated. Proper interpretation of the rules and regulations contained in these provisions requires the assistance of an experienced and knowledgeable tax professional. The second part of our series about the most confusing provisions of the Internal Revenue Code addresses everyone’s favorite, the alternative minimum tax.

Why Is It Confusing?

  • The AMT doesn’t seem to achieve its purpose
  • Taxpayers have to compute two taxes
  • The computation of the AMT itself is enormously long and complicated

The Alternative Minimum Tax, Explained

The Alternative Minimum Tax, ExplainedUnder the Internal Revenue Code and the vast body of rules and regulations related thereto, certain tax benefits can significantly reduce the amount of taxes that a taxpayer may owe. The alternative minimum tax (AMT) applies to those taxpayers with high levels of income by limiting these benefits and ensuring that these taxpayers pay at least a minimum amount of tax. If the AMT applies to you, you may lose many credits or deductions you would normally receive if you didn’t have to pay the AMT.

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